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A day to remember Jackie Robinson

The Seattle Mariners line up for pregame ceremonies for Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium on April 15, 2015. Photo: Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

The Seattle Mariners line up for pregame ceremonies for Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium on April 15, 2015. Photo: Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

We celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Negro Leagues a while back and now we take a moment to celebrate Jackie Robinson Day, a Major League Baseball-wide celebration that occurs every April 15.

This year teams are celebrating online rather than on the field due to the coronavirus, proving Robinson will always be remembered, even during a crisis.

It was on April 15, 1947, the opening day of the baseball season, when Robinson broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball by playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers, a moment that will never be forgotten. Former MLB commissioner Bud Selig made sure of that.

Jackie Robinson as a shortstop for the Kansas City Monarchs in 1944. Photo: Sporting News via Getty Images

Jackie Robinson as a shortstop for the Kansas City Monarchs in 1944. Photo: Sporting News via Getty Images

In 1997, on the 50th anniversary of Robinson’s debut, MLB, under Selig, retired Robinson’s No. 42 for all teams league-wide.

In 2004, Selig designated April 15 as Jackie Robinson Day, explaining, "Why do we celebrate? Because no generation should ever forget what Jackie Robinson did. So that every young player not only knows who Jackie Robinson is, but understands what Jackie did for him. All the great players who followed, they came because Jackie Robinson not only succeeded, but succeeded in a way that paved the way for others."

In 2007, Cincinnati Reds outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. asked permission from Commissioner Selig to wear Robinson’s number on Jackie Robinson Day. Permission was granted, and 150 players wound up wearing No. 42 that day.

In 2009, the MLB made it a requirement that all players, managers, coaches and umpires wear No. 42 on Jackie Robinson Day.

No, Selig and MLB made sure nobody will forget Jackie Robinson and what he did.