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Lelands acquires Brown Brothers and its legendary photo archive

Collectors will be able to buy prints and one-of-a-kind negatives from this historic archive for first time

MATTAWAN, N.J. -- Lelands, among the most respected auction houses in sports cards and memorabilia, announced the acquisition of Brown Brothers and its photography archive, recognized as the most comprehensive American stock photo library covering events of the 20th Century.

"We are humbled and honored to carry the torch and continue the Brown Brothers legacy,” Lelands President Mike Heffner said. “While we will continue to license images as has been the company's tradition, for the very first time in history, we will offer the actual vintage prints and original negatives for sale through our ongoing auctions."

1913 Eddie Collins World Series Glass Plate Negative: Remarkable glass plate negative featuring Eddie Collins during the 1913 World Series at the Polo Grounds in N.Y. This all original, 5x7" glass-plate negative was taken by one of the Brown Brothers photographers during that memorable series, and stored in their archive for decades until being recently discovered. Crystal clear image is as impressive as the subject matter and EX condition overall. 

1913 Eddie Collins World Series Glass Plate Negative: Remarkable glass plate negative featuring Eddie Collins during the 1913 World Series at the Polo Grounds in N.Y. This all original, 5x7" glass-plate negative was taken by one of the Brown Brothers photographers during that memorable series, and stored in their archive for decades until being recently discovered. Crystal clear image is as impressive as the subject matter and EX condition overall. 

Founded in New York City in 1904, brothers Arthur and Charles Brown launched the news photography service that would eventually become the preeminent stock photo licensing company in the United States. As New York grew into a world-class metropolis, so did the company, which ultimately expanded to 12 full-time photographers and a cadre of notable independent photographers. Assignments spilled outside of the city, and soon Brown Brothers covered noteworthy happenings and personalities from the nation's capital to New England.

Babe Ruth Boston Braves Original Negative by Charles Conlon: Extremely scarce 1935 Charles Conlon negative features an ageing Babe Ruth posed in the dugout wearing his crisp and clean Boston Braves uniform and hat. Negative still lives in its envelope that features Conlon's handwriting and other notations. Comes with 8x10" print (made in the 1960s). 

Babe Ruth Boston Braves Original Negative by Charles Conlon: Extremely scarce 1935 Charles Conlon negative features an ageing Babe Ruth posed in the dugout wearing his crisp and clean Boston Braves uniform and hat. Negative still lives in its envelope that features Conlon's handwriting and other notations. Comes with 8x10" print (made in the 1960s). 

The company covered some of the most important political, sports, architecture, technology, and historical happenings of the first half of the 20th Century, with Brown Brothers building up an impressive photography collection. The company also added to its archive through significant acquisitions, which explains why the Brown Brothers archive has historic photographs from as far back as the 1860s, well before the company's founding. The archive's importance grew as publishers, producers, museums, and advertising agencies worldwide began to license the photography.

Home Run Baker by Charles Conlon: Up close and personal photograph of Home Run Baker by Charles Conlon. From his days with the Yankees in New York, this image shows a focused Baker, in full uniform with hat and bat. The 8x10" example is mounted on board, features some crop marks and has a few handwritten notations on the reverse side. 

Home Run Baker by Charles Conlon: Up close and personal photograph of Home Run Baker by Charles Conlon. From his days with the Yankees in New York, this image shows a focused Baker, in full uniform with hat and bat. The 8x10" example is mounted on board, features some crop marks and has a few handwritten notations on the reverse side. 

Many great photographers worked with the Brown Brothers, from Charles Duprez to baseball lensman extraordinaire Charles Conlon. Conlon captured some of the most memorable baseball photos of all time, including many used for baseball cards.

These are historical photos of Brown Brothers photographers and archivists at work, circa early 20th Century. 

These are historical photos of Brown Brothers photographers and archivists at work, circa early 20th Century. 

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Unlike newspaper archives, most of the Brown Brothers archive images are not news service or wire photographs but are original prints, some of which have never been published or even seen. Many of the original glass plate and cellulose from the cameras of these greats are in the archive. These glass plate negatives from photographers like Conlon are much rarer than the prints themselves.

Heffner explains that this is the first time in history that collectors can buy physical prints and one-of-a-kind negatives from this historical archive. He said, "One could argue that some of the images in this collection are as rare and unique as it gets. Selling these incredible pieces of history not only ensures the safety and integrity of these works but also gives the collecting world a chance to own a part of this extraordinary archive."

Christy Mathewson Photograph by Charles Conlon: Taken by the legendary Charles Conlon, this original Type I photo features Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson doing what he does best, throwing a baseball. The 6.25x9.25" photo is highlighted with some cropping marks along with Conlon's writing on the reverse in pencil. Corners have some chipping. 

Christy Mathewson Photograph by Charles Conlon: Taken by the legendary Charles Conlon, this original Type I photo features Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson doing what he does best, throwing a baseball. The 6.25x9.25" photo is highlighted with some cropping marks along with Conlon's writing on the reverse in pencil. Corners have some chipping. 

Brown Brothers' photos and the rare glass plate and cellulose negatives will be made immediately available in Lelands ongoing auctions. Because the acquisition is among the last of the significant photo archives that remain intact and virtually unpicked, it is substantial in size and scope. Heffner expects that the library will take years to process and sell to completion.

"We look forward to the discoveries we will make as we pour through the archive," said Heffner, "and excited to share these rare and vintage finds with our clientele."

For more information, visit Lelands.  

Source: Lelands